otterparade:

congragulation:

the only ship i need is a scholarship can i get a hallelujah

image




Clara Bow in Rough House Rosie (1927)

Clara Bow in Rough House Rosie (1927)



Steve McQueen kisses Natalie Wood’s hand as they meet to discuss their next film, Love with the Proper Stranger (1963). Photographed by John Dominis.


Our Love Is Here To Stay
Dinah Washington - After Hours with Miss "D"
(82)

But, oh, my dear, our love is here to stay
Together we’re going a long, long way
In time the Rockies may crumble, Gibraltar may tumble
They’re only made of clay, but our love is here to stay



icanstandforsomething:

EARLY VOTING starts TODAY (Oct 20) in TEXAS ~~~~~ PLEASE REBLOG to get voters out there for WENDY DAVIS ~~~~~ Don’t forget your proper ID since the Texas Voter ID law is in place now!

icanstandforsomething:

EARLY VOTING starts TODAY (Oct 20) in TEXAS
~~~~~
PLEASE REBLOG to get voters out there for WENDY DAVIS
~~~~~
Don’t forget your proper ID since the Texas Voter ID law is in place now!

— Shared 17 hours ago , 12 notes - via saint04 / Source
reblog



rustons:


The dilemma for Anna May Wong was increasingly obvious. Despite her triumph in The Thief of Bagdad and continued good reviews in mediocre productions, her career was stalled in Hollywood. True, she was now a staple in movie magazines, with full-page spreads appearing regularly. But her chances of moving up from supporting or featured player to star were improbable. Production codes against interracial kissing meant that she could not graduate to star billing, even in films with Orientalist themes. Rather, she had to watch as less talented white women took the roles that might have given her more fame, and at least more sympathetic parts. Despite her great beauty, she was cast as a prostitute, an opium dealer, or simply as insignificant color. Her final scenes featured suicide by knife or death by overdose of opium.

Anna May Wong: From Laundryman’s Daughter to Hollywood Legend (Graham Russell Gao Hodges)

rustons:

The dilemma for Anna May Wong was increasingly obvious. Despite her triumph in The Thief of Bagdad and continued good reviews in mediocre productions, her career was stalled in Hollywood. True, she was now a staple in movie magazines, with full-page spreads appearing regularly. But her chances of moving up from supporting or featured player to star were improbable. Production codes against interracial kissing meant that she could not graduate to star billing, even in films with Orientalist themes. Rather, she had to watch as less talented white women took the roles that might have given her more fame, and at least more sympathetic parts. Despite her great beauty, she was cast as a prostitute, an opium dealer, or simply as insignificant color. Her final scenes featured suicide by knife or death by overdose of opium.

Anna May Wong: From Laundryman’s Daughter to Hollywood Legend (Graham Russell Gao Hodges)



If you live in Texas early voting starts today so EVERYBODY GO VOTE and specifically VOTE FOR WENDY DAVIS



in my film history class we were talking about mgm today and while we were jotting down notes the prof listed the most famous stars they had under contract and asked which one was our favorite and almost everyone said judy garland it made my day

— Shared 19 hours ago , 3 notes
reblog





Twin Peaks theme
Angelo Badalamenti
(22,141)

Angelo Badalamenti : Twin Peaks theme (1990)





overlypolitebisexual:

cat people: dogs are cool too
dog people: cats don’t feel love did you know a cat once MURDERED my MOTHER



every time I make a tuition payment I have a mini heart attack



bizarrelosangeles:

"Mary had her hand in everything, writing scripts, arguing with directors, making suggestions to other players…and her ideas were helpful. I am convinced that Mary could have risen to the top in United States Steel if she had decided to be a Carnegie instead of a movie star." — Adolph Zukor on Mary Pickford. 

bizarrelosangeles:

"Mary had her hand in everything, writing scripts, arguing with directors, making suggestions to other players…and her ideas were helpful. I am convinced that Mary could have risen to the top in United States Steel if she had decided to be a Carnegie instead of a movie star." — Adolph Zukor on Mary Pickford.